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Food

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A local catering service is making waves at events large and small, corporate and residential, casual and refined. Read on for all the delicious details!

currentcatering
Current Catering by Bensons
. It might be a new name on the local catering scene, but they certainly aren’t beginners.

Bensons Catering was founded by the Bernstein Family in 1981. Over the decades, Bensons was selected to cater in some of Tri-State’s most prestigious homes and venues, such as the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, Music Hall, The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, and The Western & Southern Open.

But after three generations in the business, it was time for Benson’s Catering to get current — quite literally. “Current Catering by Bensons is a new and updated version of Benson’s Catering,” says Current Catering owner Terri Bernstein. “The third generation of the Bernstein family has now taken over the daily operations.”122214SOCIAL

While Benson’s Catering saw much success, Bernstein says that they wanted to take those 33 years of experience and incorporate the fresh, new ideas of today. According to Bernstein, the business plan for Current Catering by Bensons was finalized in March 2014 and implementation of that plan got off the ground in October 2014.

From corporate dinners and business boxed lunches to weddings and galas, or even family picnics and household holiday parties, this full-service catering business offers services to a variety of customers. “We do many small house parties all the way up to the Great American Insurance Christmas Party every year for 7,000 people,” says Bernstein, adding that they’re always looking to expand. “We have a whole team out and about looking for new ideas and business.”

According to Bernstein, the team at Current Catering by Bensons will design a menu to fit nearly any taste, occasion or price point. Breakfast starts at $8 per plate, lunch starts at $10 per plate and a dinner menu is created starting at $14.95 per plate. And if you want to pair with your food with beverage service, Current Catering by Bensons also holds a Kentucky catering liquor license!

Each year, Bernstein says Current Catering by Bensons, as well as their other family owned business BB Riverboats, always gives back to the community that supports them. In fact, she adds, when they consider the donations they provide, they’re giving tens of thousands of dollars to many local organizations.

To learn more about Current Catering by Bensons, visit www.current-catering.com or send an email to info@current-catering.com. You can also check them out on Facebook.

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011915ADVERTORIAL

There’s only one thing that makes the food at Mama Mimi’s even better: WINE! That’s why they’re now offering between 15-30 boutique offerings of small production wines at their Kenwood, Anderson and Oakley locations.

These aren’t the boring, same-old-same-old wines you’ll find at Kroger. These are fun, specialty wines that were hand-picked to perfectly pair with the menu times at Mama Mimi’s. Brands include Don Bosco, Underwood, Borsao and Aves Del Sur.

 

If you’re more of a beer buff, they have that too. Available at all locations, Mama Mimi’s carries options from Madtree Brewing Company, Breckenridge Brewery, Lexington Brewing (Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale), and Two Brothers Brewing (a gluten free option!).

 

To learn more about Mama Mimi’s, visit www.mamamimis.com. Make sure you “like” them on Facebook and watch our exclusive webcast with Mama Mimi’s below!

This is a special advertising supplement, paid for by Mama Mimi’s

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121514ADVERTORIAL

Pair the fresh lineup of vegetables and cheeses in Mama Mimi’s Veggie Lasagna with the
brightness of fine tannins of Underwood’s Pinot Noir (available at all three Cincinnati locations)!


 

The holidays are here, and so are all those great family gatherings and food galore. But that doesn’t mean you need to slave away in the kitchen making all the food, and then succumb to elastic waistband pants from eating it all.

 

Mama Mimi’s makes family nights fun and stress-free. You can have all the healthy, freshly made meals you see on Pinterest but don’t have the time to make. They’re made-to-order, too. So, if little Johnny is gluten intolerant, order up a gluten free pizza. If mom doesn’t like mushrooms, just tell them to hold those and load up on spinach instead.

 

While Mama Mimi’s is known for their gourmet take ‘n’ bake pizzas, they also have delicious lasagnas, pastas, calzones, salads, and cookies, too. Click here to view their full menu. Oh, and since you’re making it a family night, click here to download Mama Mimi’s fun family games.


If your family loves their libations, make sure you chat with the in house wine-beer experts at Mama Mimi’s so they can assist and give recommendations on the perfect pairings and serving suggestions. Click here to view their spirits selection.

 

Once you submit your order online, just pick it up, throw it in the oven, and by the time the table is set, you’ll have a fresh, delicious, hot meal. Plus, you’ll love that you didn’t sacrifice health for ease, and you spent your time with family and not the four walls of your kitchen.

 

To learn more, watch our exclusive webcast with Mama Mimi’s below.

This is a special advertising supplement, paid for by Mama Mimi’s.

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092214ADVERTORIAL

Being a working mom (who’s trying to lose a baby belly – ack!), I want fresh and healthy food that’s also quick, easy, and affordable. An impossible combo, right? I thought so too, until I discovered the amazingness that is Mama Mimi’s.

 

Mama Mimi’s Take ‘n Bake Pizza is the result of a young couple’s dream to help others achieve a balance of work and family. With other young families in mind, Jeff and Jodi Aufdencamp opened for business in 2000 with traditional values and family recipes, all centered around fresh, hand-picked, healthy ingredients. It provided a quick and delicious solution to the often rushed family dinner hour.

 

From that moment on, Mama Mimi’s has built a loyal following of customers who refuse to compromise a quality meal for a high-paced lifestyle. Using many of the recipes straight from the cookbook of their Grandma Mimi, Mama Mimi’s provides its customers with quality gourmet pizzas, pastas, calzones, lasagnas and salads that’ll fill your home with the aroma of quality home cooking.

 

I married into an Italian family, where I quickly learned that food and time spent together were top on the priority list, so Mama Mimi’s is perfect for us. I’ve been bringing home pizzas on my way home from work (they even have gluten free for my hubby who has a gluten allergy!) and I love it. I put my custom order in online, pick it up, throw it in the oven when I get home and it’s ready to eat by the time I set the table.

 

It’s not oily, soggy pizza that you feel guilty about the next day. They make their own dough and sauces, use premium cheeses (not the greasy processed stuff) and cut all their veggies that morning. You know, all the things Pinterest inspires me to do, but I never have time for. Oh, and what I love most about it is that not having to spend all that time in the kitchen to make that healthy meal buys me more time with my family, which now with our new baby, is more precious than ever!

 

To learn more about Mama Mimi’s, visit www.mamamimis.com. Click here to get an exclusive discount for Cincy Chic readers (free salad with any pizza when you sign up for their email list). Also, “like” them on Facebook and watch our exclusive webcast with Mama Mimi’s below.

Editor’s Note: This is a special advertising supplement, paid for by Mama Miami’s

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Dear Holly: What is the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes? Am I going to get it? -Sweet Tooth.

 

Dear Sweet Tooth: Anything that we eat that contains carbohydrates will eventually be broken down in our digestive system to individual sugar molecules. These tiny sugars are the building blocks to starchy breads, potatoes, rice, fruit, milk, and sweets. Any of these foods, not just desserts, can impact blood sugar.

 

Once sugars are absorbed from our digestive tract into our blood, they are transported to our liver for processing and to each and every cell as fuel. The gatekeeper for entering each cell is insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas. Without insulin, the cells cannot open their gates to allow the glucose inside. Without sufficient insulin, blood sugars can quickly rise and eventually cause damage. Everyone has some circulating glucose – the potential for trouble is if these levels get too high or too low.

 

Type 1 diabetes is when a person’s pancreas stops making insulin. The remedy? Injecting insulin. These days there are different of types of insulin, ways to inject and how to monitor changes in blood sugar throughout the day. Insulin is an excellent medication and works well if the person managing the blood sugar has the proper education and support.

 

Type 2 diabetes is more common. Approximately 95% of the people in the US with diabetes have Type 2. Things are more complicated here. The pancreas is still making some insulin, but less than is needed, and the levels decline with time. The muscle cells are also resistant to insulin trying to let the glucose in. My analogy is that the cells are like a bratty teenager – insulin is knocking on the cell door but the cells aren’t responding.

 

There are a variety of medications used to help support healthy blood sugars. Each carries different risks and benefits. Some medications act at the muscle site to improve the response to the declining levels of insulin, others act at the pancreas to increase production. Some medications decrease carbohydrate absorption from the GI tract and others lower the amount of stored carbohydrate that is released by the liver.

 

Gestational diabetes can occur during pregnancy. The physiology is similar to that of Type 2 diabetes where the body resists the insulin that is being made. It often resolves after delivery of the baby, but the fact that may get glossed over is that having had gestational diabetes significantly increases your risk for developing Type 2 diabetes down the line.

 

Will you get diabetes? If I could predict that, I would be accepting a Nobel prize! Risk for developing Type 2 diabetes increases with age, with obesity, a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet. Certain groups are more vulnerable to diabetes because of their genes.

 

In a diagnosis of any kind of diabetes, a solid foundation of education is imperative to successful management. Doctors and dietitians talk about following a “diabetes diet” but it isn’t really anything so different than my usual goals for clients; moderate portions of carbohydrates at each meal, even spacing of eating throughout the day, skipping concentrated sweets most of the time.

 

If you have a diagnosis of diabetes, I recommend you make an appointment with a dietitian to optimize your eating and protect your health.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Why do you care about bikes so much? -Four Wheel Drive

 

Dear Four Wheel Drive- Nutrition is one big piece in the overall puzzle of health and wellness. Exercise, including riding bikes, helps to achieve good overall fitness. Being fit improves many health variables: our ability to handle stress, our sleeping patterns, eating habits and various hormone levels. Biking, health and nutrition are related!

 

I grew up in Oxford, and shared similar views on bikes to many midwestern folks – bikes are something kids ride, albeit decreasingly, and something crazy spandex-clad folks do on the weekends.

 

Living in Washington DC for three years, traveling around the world and completing the Climate Ride, a bike trek from New York City to Washington DC, have significantly altered my biking views. In DC, I did not own a car. I purchased a hybrid bicycle to bridge the gaps in public transportation and in the process, fell back in love with a favorite, forgotten childhood activity. I enjoyed having a chance to build physical activity in my day, to know that I am burning calories instead of fossil fuel. Usually I felt refreshed when I got to work, instead of frazzled by traffic jams. Plus, I was saving money by not using the trains and buses or by having a car.

 

Traveling in Europe opened my eyes to a completely different view on bicycles. There, bikes are an integral part of day to day life. Many people commute via bicycle and the crowded bike racks prove it! There is less anxiety about cars and bikes co-existing because it is a normal part of life. I was amazed in Germany that there were roads for bikes, separate lanes for bicycles and sidewalks for pedestrians. Sweden has even built a bike highway!

 

Like making changes in nutrition, the common flaw in thinking is that is has to be all or nothing; either you ride your bike for every trip or it doesn’t matter. Not true – anytime that you choose two wheels over four you are lowering your impact on the environment and improving your fitness.

 

Research that looks at obesity risk and transportation tends to find that folks who to drive to work will weigh more than those who walk or bike to work. For all of the folks who live and work in town, biking or walking to work is a great opportunity to stay slim and avoid the parking headaches (and possible tickets).

 

Exercise benefits not only your cardiovascular fitness, it also improves brain function. Adults who exercise tend to have better problem solving skills, better memory and a physically larger and more connected brain. Kids benefit too; those who cycle or walk to school demonstrate a measurable increase in concentration that lasts for up to four hours. Exercise may have a larger impact than breakfast!

 

Exercise, mood and eating patterns are tightly related. Regular exercise helps to curb cortisol and adrenaline – hormones that can be linked to poor eating habits. Regular exercise can promote mood boosting chemicals to lower anxiety and improve depression symptoms. Regular exercise can even help you to sleep better, which is the foundation for being healthy during the waking hours.

 

Check out your local bike shop for group rides, classes for learning to bike safely on the road and how to maintain your bicycle. The BikeWise Oxford offers group bike rides on Monday and Wednesday evenings. Connect with the Bikeable Oxford! on facebook and the Oxford Visitors Bureau to learn about building more bike lanes and paths in and around the city.

 

Safety first; ensure that your bike is in good working order, has proper lighting and reflectors so that you can see and be seen. Stay alert and wear your helmet!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: What are starchy vegetables? Should I avoid them? -Spuds

 

Dear Spuds: Starchy vegetables have their name because they are a rich source of carbohydrate. They include potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, corn and dried beans. Our body needs carbohydrates for fuel, but many of us go overboard with carbs and so our meals are out of balance; more carbs relative to proteins and fats, and likely too many calories overall.

 

Ideally, a meal would have a moderate amount of carbohydrates, some protein and heart-healthy fats and a whole bunch of non-starchy veggies and perhaps some fruit.

 

Starchy vegetables are not better or worse than their non-starchy peers, they’re simply different. Potatoes are probably the veggies with the worst reputation of the bunch, but that stems from their common prep in a deep fryer more than their original nutrient content. Clients often tell me that corn is their favorite vegetable. I too enjoy sweet corn, but if that starchy vegetable is a side dish on the menu, I am going to pair it with broccoli or some other lower calorie veggie.

 

Beans are a very healthy food that we could stand to include more often. In addition to their complex carbohydrate content, beans also are a very rich source of fiber and protein.

 

The most important thing to know about starchy veggies is their proper portion. To estimate how big of a portion of carbohydrate-rich foods is best for you at your meals, make a fist and set it on your usual plate; that is the max for all carb-heavy foods – spaghetti, rolls, rice or those starchy veggies including corn, peas, potatoes and beans.

 

If you can’t get enough mashed potatoes, rice or spaghetti, there are some tricks to enjoying these kinds of foods while maintaining a healthy balance. You can “dilute” mashed potatoes by adding steamed cauliflower which you mash – it tastes the same and cuts the calories. You can also use a food processor to cut cauliflower into tiny pieces as a substitute for rice for a fraction of the calories. When roasting potatoes, add lower-calorie peppers, onions, eggplant and mushrooms to the roasting tray.

 

I love using cooked spaghetti squash or julienned zucchini in place of pasta. You can use a julienne peeler to tame a pile of zucchini into delicate pasta threads – a healthier alternative to another loaf of zucchini bread. I even grill planks of zucchini and use them as a flavorful (and gluten free) alternative to lasagna noodles.

 

A balanced meal is a healthy meal! Starchy veggies are part of healthy eating, as long as the portion is not too large, and you also include non-starchy veggies too!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: What is BMI? -Body Mass What?

 

Dear Body Mass What: If you’ve been to a health screening lately or had an annual physical with your doctor, you may have heard the term BMI. What is it exactly, and what should yours be?

 

BMI stand for Body Mass Index and is one tool to assess your health. It is a measure of how much body weight you have relative to your height. Healthy range for adults is 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2. It is simple and inexpensive to measure and is great for looking at large groups of people, like scientists do for research projects. Like any tool, BMI has pros and cons; it is not perfect. However, BMI is pretty accurate for most, especially for those who are sedentary.

 

One flaw is that BMI looks only at total weight, not type of weight. There is no distinction between fat or muscle. For this reason, your average athlete with a high amount of muscle tissue may register falsely as “overweight” according to their BMI. For those who are have a lot of muscle on their frame, they are healthy, even if their weight may be higher than a more sedentary person.

 

BMI is not appropriate to use during pregnancy. A pregnant woman will register as “overweight” because of the baby on board. We can use BMI to gauge how much weight would be healthy to gain during pregnancy. If a woman is overweight prior to becoming pregnant, it would be healthier for her to gain less weight than a woman who is normal weight.

 

To check your own BMI, look online for a free BMI calculator, or download a free app to do the math for you. I use a BMI calculator on my phone when working with clients.

 

What about kids? You can also assess their weight for their height using BMI, but the guidelines are dependent on their age and gender. The CDC has a BMI calculator for kids. Kids are growing, and a healthy weight depends on where they are on their growth continuum. A healthy toddler has chubby thighs and cheeks while a healthy 4-6 year old is quite lean.

 

One other simple tool that complements BMI is measuring your waist as well as a waist to hip ratio. Lean, healthy folks have a small waist. For men, we are aiming for less than 40 inches, ladies less than 35. For the ratio of waist circumference divided by hip circumference, men are striving for less than 1 and women less than 0.8. As one pound of muscle tissue is more compact than fat tissue, those with more of their weight coming from muscle will have a more compact frame.

 

Tip: pay attention to how your pants and belts are fitting. If you gain 5 pounds of fat and lose five pounds of muscle, the scale will not have budged an ounce, but your pants will be tighter. Conversely, if you improve your fitness, gain muscle and lose fat, don’t get frustrated if the scale isn’t budging, you are still a healthier person, as evidenced by your leaner, tighter frame.

 

BMI is just one tool to assess health. When doing a health assessment for yourself, also consider your waist circumference, your weight, your eating habits, what your usual beverages are, your stress level, your fitness level and usual hours per night of sleep. No single tool will perfectly assess health, but it can add dimension to the overall picture.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly – My doctor is talking about the DASH diet for me. What is it? – Salty

 

Dear Salty: The DASH diet stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. It is an eating plan that helps to manage high blood pressure, also known as hypertension, abbreviated HTN.

 

Your blood pressure is a dynamic, changing number. The top number is called systolic and the bottom is called diastolic. The systolic is the measured pressure in your vessels when the heart is contracting and the bottom is the pressure when the heart is (briefly) relaxed. We measure blood pressure using a cuff called a sphygmomanometer (say that three times fast!).

 

The goal is to be below 120/80. If the top number rises above 120 consistently, that is considered pre-hypertension. If it rises above 140 consistently, that is considered hypertension. Unfortunately, there is not that much wiggle room between kind of high and too high. Above 80 but below 90 for the diastolic is pre-HTN, above 90 is HTN.

 

Throughout the day, your physical activity, hydration, stress and other factors influence where your blood pressure is. Being ill, having an injury or taking certain medications can also influence your readings. Some people have genes that make them more vulnerable to HTN. We also tend to see our blood pressure rise with age. Some of these factors can be modified – we are stuck with our genes and age.

 

The DASH plan is one way to influence your numbers! It is based on sound research; it is not a fad diet or quick fix! The plan helps to control calories and portions to manage having a healthy weight; which is one other factor influencing blood pressure.

 

What does the eating plan look like? Loads of fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds, low-fat dairy, whole grains, vegetable oils and beans. The eating plan minimizes red meat, sweets, refined carbohydrates, and sodium. Several minerals influence blood pressure. On average, Americans are consuming too much sodium (salt) and insufficient potassium, magnesium and calcium. The DASH diet reverses that ratio and therefore improves blood pressure.

 

HTN is considered a “silent killer” because most people do not have any symptoms of their high blood pressure. When you actually feel the high blood pressure may not be until you’re having a stroke or aneurysm! The DASH diet can also improve weight, blood lipid values and blood sugar. If you are ready to take charge of your blood pressure, an appointment with your local dietitian and the DASH diet can help support your goals!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Any tips for staying hydrated in this heat? -Parched

 

Dear Parched: It is really easy to get behind on your water intake in the heat of the summer. Children and older adults are especially vulnerable to dehydration. Kids, because they have a lot of surface area relative to their body size, and older adults because their thirst mechanism declines with age. This means that it takes longer for them to feel thirsty.

 

How do you know if you are dehydrated? Monitor color of your urine. Light colored urine indicates proper hydration. This is much more accurate than counting glasses or ounces of water as your hydration needs vary day to day with variations in exercise, temperature, foods consumed and more.

 

The first step to preventing dehydration is to not wait until you are feeling thirsty. Our thirst mechanism is not very sensitive at any age, and declines with each passing decade.

 

Drink your preferred temperature. If you like hot drinks year round, keep your kettle going and enjoy hot water, hot water with lemon and a variety of teas. If you prefer arctic drinks, keep your ice maker running, a pitcher of water in the fridge, freeze fruit for flavor and chill your water then drink with a straw.

 

Use your technology. Set a reminder on your phone. Use tracking software to monitor beverage intake or use the free Daily Water app to keep tabs. Using the app you can set alarms to remind you to drink water.

 

Or skip technology: purchase an AquaTally cup, a great tool that uses two silicone bands around a cup with a lid and straw to track progress throughout the day. This cup is especially useful for older adults. Dehydration is a common reason to for an ER visit in this group; they may be dealing with early dementia and forget to drink water or may be taking a medication that suppresses their thirst. It is also useful to monitor maximum water intake for those with a fluid restriction.

 

Eat an abundance of fruits and veggies – they’re excellent for your health and loaded with water. Have fruits and vegetables with each meal and snack. Smoothies and soups are a great hydration choice too, if you find recipes that are not loaded with added sugars or fat. You can even make popsicles with juice, yogurt or coffee.

 

Keep reusable bottle with you. Skip bottled water: it isn’t better than tap, costs more money and creates too much trash.

 

Be mindful while traveling. We are not focusing on water as much on the move. Also, the desert air on planes sucks the water right out of you! Make goals – “I’ll drink this big bottle of water each day before lunch.” Track them and monitor progress. Give yourself a small, non-food reward for complying with your goals. Bottoms up!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!