The only online publication for women in Greater Cincinnati
Food

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Dear Holly: How can I eat out less often? -Drive Through

 

Dear Drive Through: Making your own food gives you control over cost, the portion size and the nutrition. Hand those reins over to a restaurant, and it may be harder to meet your health and wellness goals as well as stay within your budget. But when you are hungry, it can be difficult, even for a dietitian, to make a sensible decision. That is why you must plan ahead and create your environment to support your goals.

 

Have ready-to-eat things in house, in your office and in your purse. Nuts, dried fruit and healthy bars are all good choices that will not spoil or make a mess.

 

Combo examples:
– Stock freezer with veggies, fruit, cooked rice, leftover soup, stew and chili so that you can thaw and eat. When you cook lasagnas and other casseroles, make double the recipe and freeze the extras.
Whole grains do take longer to cook, but freeze beautifully. I like to cook extra brown rice, quinoa and barley and freeze in 1-2 cup portions. Seal in a zip-top bag, label with the contents and date and voila – whole grains ready in a flash!
– Keep certain staples on hand so that an easy dinner can happen quickly: canned beans, including refried beans, eggs, onion, potatoes, whole grain pasta and canned tomatoes are the main ingredients for many different dishes and are almost always available in my house.
– A quick search on Pinterest for “freezer meals” will give you loads of ideas. Many of these are bags of ingredients that can go directly into the crock pot. Pour the frozen contents in the crock pot in the morning and come home to a delicious, hot meal.
– Make a list of favorite meals so that you can refer to it when you need inspiration.
– Plan meals for the week – this way you know what you need at the grocery store (and what you can skip).
– For those going to work or school, pack lunch the night before (and even pack breakfast). Our brains just don’t always work as quickly in the morning, so if lunch is already prepared, that is one less step to worry about.

 

Does that mean that I never eat out? Absolutely not! Eating out is part of living in this world, whether for convenience on a busy day or as a fun occasion. It is also a great way to explore new food. I do not even limit myself to the healthiest choice on the menu all the time, either. Having fun treat foods is part of living a happy, balanced and healthy life.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Any tips on packing a picnic? -Yogi Bear
Dear Yogi: I do! I love a great picnic; spreading out a blanket or commandeering a picnic table and spreading out an afternoon snack or dinner feast. It is a celebration of good food and good weather.

 

Start with excellent food. Plan a meal with lots of color: we feast with our eyes first – a wide variety of color indicates a great blend of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals in the meal (unless it is skittles!).

 

Do the prep at home: the most enjoyable picnic is one without stress. Plan your menu so that it is ready to eat straight from your picnic basket. Fruit kabobs, grain salads, kale salad, hummus and veggies, smoothies, sandwiches and wraps are all delicious, portable and ready to go from picnic basket to table.

 

Use the real stuff: cloth napkins are lighter on the planet, are harder for the wind to blow away and add ambiance to your picnic. Plastic silverware is simply harder to use: get an inexpensive set of metal flatware and reuse them all summer.

 

Skip the sugar: sodas and sweet drinks should be minimized. Have fun and stay hydrated with infused waters; experiment with fruit and herbs to find your favorite custom blend. Make it sparkling by adding seltzer water.

 

Keep it safe: Keep hot food hot and cold food cold. Use ice packs or frozen water bottles to prevent bacteria growth and food poisoning if you are transporting perishable foods. Remember food is no longer good if it’s been sitting out for more than two hours, or one hour in weather above 90°F. If packing burgers or chicken for the grill, make sure to keep raw and ready-to-eat foods separate in your picnic basket.

 

Beyond the basket: Sunscreen and bug spray will help ward off burns and bites. Pack a soccer ball, Frisbee or bocce set for some active fun in the sun!

 

Looking for recipes? Check out my blog for picnic ready ideas! June 18th is International Picnic Day, after all!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly – Is all sugar bad? How much is too much? -Lolly Pop

 

Dear Lolly Pop – Some sugars are naturally occurring in healthy foods, such as the lactose in milk or the fructose in fruit. The fiber, fat and protein in these fruits and dairy products helps to curb the rise in blood sugar.

 

In our processed food nation, we are also having way too much added sugar. Some sources are obvious, like in soda or candy. Too many, though, are sneaky, like the sugars in ketchup, spaghetti sauce, dried fruit, salad dressings, peanut butter, cereals, granola bars and some drinks.

 

Did you know that comparing spoonfuls of ketchup and ice-cream, the ketchup will have more sugar than the ice-cream?

 

When you look at a nutrition facts panel, you usually will see total grams of sugar per serving. One teaspoon of sugar equals four grams. Currently our food labels do not discriminate between added sugars and those naturally occurring in the product, but this may change with labeling reform. To be safe, it is best to check the ingredients. Take note, though, that sugar may have many different names – corn syrup, agave, honey, fructose, brown rice syrup, fruit juice concentrate are just a few pseudonyms you will come across.

 

The American Heart Association recommends we limit our added sugars:
– 3 teaspoons of added sugar for children
– 6 teaspoons of added sugar for women
– 9 teaspoons of added sugar for men

 

Try to use honey and maple syrup when sweetening your foods. While some advocates claim these choices are healthier, nutritionally they are about the same. What I like is that they are available locally. And, because they cost significantly more than table sugar, it makes you consider if you really need it before using.

 

It seems that for some people, the more sugar you have the more you want. It also seems like our tongue calibrates to our usual level of sugar. When I was in college I drank a lot of diet soda, a habit I later ditched. When I was drinking a lot of those artificially sweetened drinks, I tried berry seltzer and was horrified at the bland taste. My tastes buds were ramped up! After I kicked the diet soda to the curb and reduced my sugar intake, seltzer tasted great! So while we are all predisposed to like sweet and salty foods and drinks, how sweet or how salty we like things to be is relative to our usual “level.”

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: What is gluten? Should I be avoiding it? -Goodness Grains!

 

Dear Goodness Grains:Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Gluten gives structure to baked goods making it the backbone for traditional baking and a common thickener and emulsifier in sauces, gravies and spice blends.

 

Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity (aka gluten intolerance) both require an elimination of gluten from the diet, but are not the same condition.

 

Celiac disease is a genetically based autoimmune disease that an estimated 1 in 133 Americans have. The symptoms may include diarrhea, anemia, weight loss or growth failure. They can also include constipation and abdominal pain, fatigue, infertility, headache or fatigue. You can even have celiac disease with no symptoms!

 

83% of people with celiac disease are either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. When a person with celiac disease eats gluten, it sets off an immune reaction that damages the the intestine and interferes with the absorption of nutrients. There is no pharmaceutical cure for celiac disease. The only treatment is a strict, lifelong gluten-free diet.

 

Celiac disease was once thought of as a childhood ailment. It is now known that the condition affects men and women of all ages and races, and can develop at any time.

 

If following a gluten free diet, it is important to still include carbohydrates as a part of your healthy eating plan. While gluten is found in many carbohydrate choices, healthy eating does not mean carbohydrate free. GF choices include potatoes, sweet potatoes, corn, peas and beans. Oats may be permitted if they’re processed in a facility that does not process wheat.

 

The abundance of gluten free choices in the grocery store and in restaurants makes life easier for those requiring gluten-free choices. It does not indicate that everyone needs to comply.

 

Visit www.celiaccentral.org for more information. May is celiac awareness month.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: What is the Mediterranean Diet? Do you recommend it? -All Greek to Me

Dear All Greek to Me: May is National Mediterranean Diet Month, celebrating an eating plan to which I give my stamp of approval!

 

The Mediterranean diet is an eating plan beneficial to our health. It is rich in whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, heart healthy fats and focuses on fish and seafood rather than red meat. Each meal has a plant-based foundation of fruits and veggies, whole grains and heart healthy fats and builds from there. Limited are sweets and treats.

 

With all of those delicious plants, the Mediterranean diet is fiber-ful. Do you know your fiber goal? Men are aiming for 38 grams per day and ladies are aiming for 25. On average, Americans are only having 50% of their fiber goal. We can do better!

 

Olive oil is one healthy fat to include in your usual routine. Look for extra virgin for the most nutritional benefit and flavor – it is minimally processed and loaded with phytochemicals. In additional, round out your pantry with canola, walnut, avocado and grapeseed oils.

 

Heart healthy fats are also found in nuts, seeds and avocados. Once feared in the low-fat and fat-free craze of the 1980s and 1990s, we are now better educated and know that fats are an important component of healthy eating. Do not fear the fat; they won’t make you fat!

 

Enjoy nuts, seeds and nut butters on a daily basis. They are delicious, full of monounsaturated fatty acids and fiber and contribute Vitamin E as well. When purchasing peanut or almond butters, look at the ingredients and skip any product that has the word “hydrogenated” as this is a source of trans-fats. Trans-fats are not part of a heart-healthy eating plan! My favorite brand is Krema, a company based in Columbus, Ohio!

 

For drinks, the eating plan also includes a moderate amount of wine (one drink per day for ladies, up to two drinks per day for gentleman). Beyond that, water is the drink of choice.

 

I recommend eating fish and other seafood, but sustainability is an issue. To make an informed choice about your seafood choices, I recommend visiting the Monterey Bay Aquarium website or downloading their free app so you have information at your fingertips while at the grocery store or eating out.

 

The Mediterranean people tend to be active. For the greatest health benefit, make your lifestyle active. Bike or walk instead of driving whenever possible.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Are all salads healthy? -Tossed

Dear Tossed: May is National Salad Month, so this is a great topic to clear the air about!

 

If you’re looking for a salad to be your meal, you need to build it right! Any meal salad that I make is going to include many veggies, some heart-healthy fats, lean protein and complex carbohydrates. That’s a meal in a bowl!

 

It is common for people to assume that any salad is healthy, when too often I see people assembling calorie bombs at the salad bar with the only vegetable being iceberg lettuce. While yes, fried chicken, cheese, croutons and a creamy dressing on top of iceberg lettuce is technically a salad, the only favor it is doing is to your taste buds, not your waistline.

 

I challenge clients to include as many colors as possible when choosing fruits and vegetables and to steer clear of croutons and other fried crunchies that are offering minimal nutritional benefit. The darker the greens the better; kale, spinach, cabbage and romaine are all great choices. Toss those with a good mixture of veggies and fruits – apple, carrot, bell pepper and tomato are my favorites – and you have a satisfying salad foundation.

 

Make sure to include a lean protein – tuna, grilled chicken, beans, marinated tofu or hard boiled eggs are all easy and healthy choices. Skip the fried chicken.

 

We do want some fats on the salad. Not only is fat an essential nutrient, fat also enable the absorption of other nutrients, like the beta-carotene in carrots. We just don’t want too much. I caution against low-fat salad dressings to maximize nutrient absorption and satiety. I like to choose a vinaigrette. Low-fat dressings are usually loaded with sugars to make up for the flavor loss with the fat reduction and can be the same amount of calories. Just keep the portion reasonable – 2 tablespoons or so.

 

Lastly, some complex carbohydrates will provide you with the energy boost you need to power through your afternoon, or help promote deep sleep. I may add sweet corn or boiled potatoes to my salad, or serve my salad with a few whole grain crackers or a piece of chewy toast.

 

A well made salad is satisfying. Ideally it has a good variety of flavors and textures and a lot of crunch. See if you can hit all of the colors of the rainbow, add some lean protein and heart healthy fat and your salad will power you through until dinner. An anemic salad, one without power, will leave you reaching for the cookie jar or vending machine.

 

Looking for more healthy and delicious cooking ideas? Check out my new Spring Cooking Class Menu and contact me to schedule your cooking party! A fun lesson, the entire meal, recipe and a free pass on doing the dishes are all included!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Is frozen yogurt healthier than ice-cream? -Spring Sweets

 

Dear Spring Sweets:
Frozen yogurt has a “health halo,”- the perception that it is healthy, without necessarily being so.

 

What is frozen yogurt? It is not a regulated term. Unlike ice-cream, which has a minimum 10% requirement of milk-fat, frozen yogurt has no legal standard definition. While it is a common assumption that frozen yogurt has live probiotics (the good bacteria), there is no guarantee.

 

If an ice-cream is lower than 10% fat, it is called ice-milk. Most soft-serve treats are not, in fact, ice-cream. Let’s consider the serving size. The recommended amount of frozen treats is one half cup or 4 ounces. This proper portion looks like two ping pong ball scoops. 1 cup, or two servings, looks like a baseball.

 

The container given to you at self-serve yogurt places is huge! The “small” bowl is 16 ounces and the large is 24. It is too easy to go overboard with your portions when starting with a bowl that mimics a bucket!

 

And what about the toppings? There seems to be a mental disconnect between the toppings and their calories when placed on top of yogurt. Candy, cookie pieces, and other sweet toppings still count, even if enjoyed with bites of frozen yogurt. I see the same phenomenon with salads; fried chicken is suddenly a healthy choice when placed on top of iceberg lettuce and smothered in ranch dressing. It is a salad, so it is healthy, right? Wrong!

 

Let’s compare frozen yogurt to ice cream. One ½ cup serving of Bryers vanilla ice-cream contains 150 calories, 7 grams of fat (4 grams saturated) and 15 grams of sugar. The ingredients are simple; Milk, Cream, Sugar, Tara Gum, Natural Flavor.

 

A few more bucks upgrades us to ½ cup of Haagen-Dazs Vanilla Bean ice-cream. One ½ cup serving contains 270 calories with 17 grams of fat (10 grams saturated fat) and 23 grams of sugar. It tastes better and costs more, because of the fat content. Fat is expensive! The ingredients are simple: cream, Skim Milk, Sugar, Egg Yolks, Ground Vanilla Beans, Vanilla Extract.

 

The interesting thing about comparing ice-cream to frozen yogurt is that self-serve yogurt venues typically list the calories in yogurt in calories per ounce. One local chain, Orange Leaf, carries a basic vanilla that has 40 calories per ounce. In order to compare to ice-cream, you must multiply that by 4 ounces to get ½ cup. In this case, ½ cup of vanilla frozen yogurt contains 160 calories – very close to the Bryers ice-cream! Also, let’s check out the ingredients listed for this frozen yogurt: Non-fat milk, sugar, corn syrup solids, coconut oil, nonfat yogurt, natural and artificial flavors, sodium caseinate, salt, potassium and sodium phosphate, guar gum, mono & diglycerides, soy lecithin, xantham gum, lactic acid bacteria. That’s three times the number of ingredients used to make the Haagen-Daz!

 

So which to choose? The one that you like best. Enjoy it as a treat once in a while, in a reasonable portion. Just don’t fool yourself that either one is a health food! You can also try my banana “ice-cream.” Peel a ripe banana, cut into chunks and freeze until solid. Place chunks in a food processor and blend until smooth and creamy. Be patient, this takes a few minutes! Stir in peanut butter and cocoa powder for an extra decadent flavor. This truly is a healthy choice.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: I am worried about my teen daughter’s health. How can I help? -Worried Mama

 

Dear Worried Mama:
Know the facts. It can be overwhelming for teen girls to experience changes in their body shape as they go through puberty. Speak with your pediatrician and dietitian to know if your teen’s weight changes are in a healthy range. If too high or too low, she may benefit from nutrition counseling.

 

Teach her to cook. Don’t know how? Take a cooking class with me! Kids who can cook some basics are not tied to restaurant sized portions or unhealthy junk when around town. Eat meals together. If it works that you eat dinner together, great. If your schedules prohibit that, then choose a different meal to be your priority.

 

Manage emotions without Ben & Jerry. If your daughter comes home upset about friend or relationship drama and your answer is two spoons and a pint, that is the coping skill she will have moving forward. While the occasional indulgence is perfectly fine, using food to smother emotions is not.

 

Take a walk together. It is hard to connect with a screen in the room. Whether it is a laptop, iPad or TV, the screen distracts from the real life connection. If you take a walk together, you have the chance to talk about what is really going on in each others lives and to fit in some physical activity too.

 

Reward without food. For a job well done, look for rewards are are exciting, without having to be food each time. Younger kids love earning stickers, bubbles or temporary tattoos, older kids may get excited about magazines, movie tickets, nail polish or make-up.

 

Indulge joyfully, too. It is perfectly reasonable to have the occasional indulgence. Demonstrating balance with healthy eating and treats helps to not demonize any foods or cultivate an all-or-nothing attitude about health and nutrition. Compliment her; her beauty, her generosity and her brain.

 

Demonstrate having a positive body image. Having worked in a local clothing boutique, I was disheartened to overhear conversations between mother and daughter where the mother was disparaging her own figure. Mom is a guide on many things, and if her own body image is poor, this can impact your daughters perception of her own figure.

 

For more information, I recommend you check out Fitsmi, an evidence-based online nutrition counseling program. They offer an engaging 16 week program for teen girls aged 13-18 as well as a 7 week program for parents. Teens, visit life180inc.com and parents, visit fitsmi.ning for more information. Ready to sign up? Use codes “teen” and “parent” on those sites to save 30%!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the first of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Do we really need eight glasses of water each day? -Bottled Up

 

Dear Bottled Up:
Water serves many important functions in our body. How much we need to drink changes day to day and depends on how much we move, the temperature and humidity, how much we eat and more.

 

The best way to know your hydration status is by checking out the color if your urine; light yellow to clear indicates adequate hydration. Anything darker means you’re ready for more water, so bottoms up! Be aware, certain medications, supplements and vitamins can alter the color of your urine, as can beets.

 

Why not wait until you’re thirsty? Our thirst mechanism is not terribly accurate to begin with and declines with age. By the time you notice thirst, you may already need a glass or two of water.

 

Did you know that much of the bottled water sold is just tap water? Most of those bottles end up in the trash for an enormous environmental impact. Our tap water is clean, reliable and affordable, so grab a reusable bottle, fill it up and skip the plastic.

 

Beyond a reusable bottle of tap water, we obtain a significant amount of water from our diet. From fruits to vegetables and soups to yogurt, our foods can contribute significantly to our hydration status. We actually make a small amount of our water too. This is called metabolic water and occurs, for example, when we link two amino acids together. Each connection made spits out one water molecule!

 

Adequate hydration is important for many reasons. Water helps to maintain a stable temperature, to transport nutrients to each cell and move waste away. It also lubricates and cushions your joints and actively participates in many chemical reactions.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Do you ever eat cookies? -Girl Scout


Dear Girl Scout:


I get this question all the time. As soon as a new acquaintances find out that I’m a dietitian, they’re steering their carts away from me in the grocery store or trying to cover their plate at a restaurant or making bold (usually false) assumptions about my diet.

 

It’s too easy to assume that health is all or nothing; you’re either eating the whole sleeve (or box) of thin mints, or being a martyr and having only iceburg lettuce and celery.

 

Luckily, health is a journey that resides somewhere in between those dire extremes. As a dietitian, I’m not the food police. I am not going to pull your cart over at the grocery store, nor will I write you a ticket for ordering french fries. My diploma did not change my taste buds. I am a foodie before I am a dietitian. If a dish doesn’t taste good, I’m not interested in eating it any more than you are.

 

I grew up with a prolific vegetable garden in the back yard and a mother who cooked dinner each night. Spring marked the beginning of fresh, delicious produce, from sugar peas to delicate asparagus. Summer marched through sweet peppers and delicious tomatoes, and Fall produced a bounty of fresh pumpkin, sweet corn and lots of purple pole beans, which my dad chose to plant because they were easier and more fun for us kids to pick. I don’t know anyone else who made applesauce during their childhood.

 

It wasn’t until I went to college and had canned mushy green beans for the first time that I understood why people didn’t like vegetables. Real food, minimally processed and cooked well, is phenomenal. I think the reason we use so much salt, condiments and seasonings is because we’re using poor quality ingredients.

 

At times I also joyfully indulge. I like to make or buy the very best version of a treat and enjoy it slowly. Having a low-quality cake or brownie from a box isn’t going to do much to curb a sweet tooth.

 

I’m also human, prone to the same stresses and worries that we all are. I’m not perfect, but I’m usually ok with that. Nutella is my kryptonite: I have not developed any moderation there. I allow a jar in my house about once per season, as it is quickly devoured. When I was in college and homesick, having a warm mug of my mom’s applesauce helped me to feel better.

 

Overall, I do eat well, try to manage stress with productive outlets and create my home and office environments to support my wellness goals. But yes, I do eat cookies, and you can too!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!