The only online publication for women in Greater Cincinnati

Food

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Dear Holly: Are all salads healthy? -Tossed

Dear Tossed: May is National Salad Month, so this is a great topic to clear the air about!

 

If you’re looking for a salad to be your meal, you need to build it right! Any meal salad that I make is going to include many veggies, some heart-healthy fats, lean protein and complex carbohydrates. That’s a meal in a bowl!

 

It is common for people to assume that any salad is healthy, when too often I see people assembling calorie bombs at the salad bar with the only vegetable being iceberg lettuce. While yes, fried chicken, cheese, croutons and a creamy dressing on top of iceberg lettuce is technically a salad, the only favor it is doing is to your taste buds, not your waistline.

 

I challenge clients to include as many colors as possible when choosing fruits and vegetables and to steer clear of croutons and other fried crunchies that are offering minimal nutritional benefit. The darker the greens the better; kale, spinach, cabbage and romaine are all great choices. Toss those with a good mixture of veggies and fruits – apple, carrot, bell pepper and tomato are my favorites – and you have a satisfying salad foundation.

 

Make sure to include a lean protein – tuna, grilled chicken, beans, marinated tofu or hard boiled eggs are all easy and healthy choices. Skip the fried chicken.

 

We do want some fats on the salad. Not only is fat an essential nutrient, fat also enable the absorption of other nutrients, like the beta-carotene in carrots. We just don’t want too much. I caution against low-fat salad dressings to maximize nutrient absorption and satiety. I like to choose a vinaigrette. Low-fat dressings are usually loaded with sugars to make up for the flavor loss with the fat reduction and can be the same amount of calories. Just keep the portion reasonable – 2 tablespoons or so.

 

Lastly, some complex carbohydrates will provide you with the energy boost you need to power through your afternoon, or help promote deep sleep. I may add sweet corn or boiled potatoes to my salad, or serve my salad with a few whole grain crackers or a piece of chewy toast.

 

A well made salad is satisfying. Ideally it has a good variety of flavors and textures and a lot of crunch. See if you can hit all of the colors of the rainbow, add some lean protein and heart healthy fat and your salad will power you through until dinner. An anemic salad, one without power, will leave you reaching for the cookie jar or vending machine.

 

Looking for more healthy and delicious cooking ideas? Check out my new Spring Cooking Class Menu and contact me to schedule your cooking party! A fun lesson, the entire meal, recipe and a free pass on doing the dishes are all included!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Is frozen yogurt healthier than ice-cream? -Spring Sweets

 

Dear Spring Sweets:
Frozen yogurt has a “health halo,”- the perception that it is healthy, without necessarily being so.

 

What is frozen yogurt? It is not a regulated term. Unlike ice-cream, which has a minimum 10% requirement of milk-fat, frozen yogurt has no legal standard definition. While it is a common assumption that frozen yogurt has live probiotics (the good bacteria), there is no guarantee.

 

If an ice-cream is lower than 10% fat, it is called ice-milk. Most soft-serve treats are not, in fact, ice-cream. Let’s consider the serving size. The recommended amount of frozen treats is one half cup or 4 ounces. This proper portion looks like two ping pong ball scoops. 1 cup, or two servings, looks like a baseball.

 

The container given to you at self-serve yogurt places is huge! The “small” bowl is 16 ounces and the large is 24. It is too easy to go overboard with your portions when starting with a bowl that mimics a bucket!

 

And what about the toppings? There seems to be a mental disconnect between the toppings and their calories when placed on top of yogurt. Candy, cookie pieces, and other sweet toppings still count, even if enjoyed with bites of frozen yogurt. I see the same phenomenon with salads; fried chicken is suddenly a healthy choice when placed on top of iceberg lettuce and smothered in ranch dressing. It is a salad, so it is healthy, right? Wrong!

 

Let’s compare frozen yogurt to ice cream. One ½ cup serving of Bryers vanilla ice-cream contains 150 calories, 7 grams of fat (4 grams saturated) and 15 grams of sugar. The ingredients are simple; Milk, Cream, Sugar, Tara Gum, Natural Flavor.

 

A few more bucks upgrades us to ½ cup of Haagen-Dazs Vanilla Bean ice-cream. One ½ cup serving contains 270 calories with 17 grams of fat (10 grams saturated fat) and 23 grams of sugar. It tastes better and costs more, because of the fat content. Fat is expensive! The ingredients are simple: cream, Skim Milk, Sugar, Egg Yolks, Ground Vanilla Beans, Vanilla Extract.

 

The interesting thing about comparing ice-cream to frozen yogurt is that self-serve yogurt venues typically list the calories in yogurt in calories per ounce. One local chain, Orange Leaf, carries a basic vanilla that has 40 calories per ounce. In order to compare to ice-cream, you must multiply that by 4 ounces to get ½ cup. In this case, ½ cup of vanilla frozen yogurt contains 160 calories – very close to the Bryers ice-cream! Also, let’s check out the ingredients listed for this frozen yogurt: Non-fat milk, sugar, corn syrup solids, coconut oil, nonfat yogurt, natural and artificial flavors, sodium caseinate, salt, potassium and sodium phosphate, guar gum, mono & diglycerides, soy lecithin, xantham gum, lactic acid bacteria. That’s three times the number of ingredients used to make the Haagen-Daz!

 

So which to choose? The one that you like best. Enjoy it as a treat once in a while, in a reasonable portion. Just don’t fool yourself that either one is a health food! You can also try my banana “ice-cream.” Peel a ripe banana, cut into chunks and freeze until solid. Place chunks in a food processor and blend until smooth and creamy. Be patient, this takes a few minutes! Stir in peanut butter and cocoa powder for an extra decadent flavor. This truly is a healthy choice.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: I am worried about my teen daughter’s health. How can I help? -Worried Mama

 

Dear Worried Mama:
Know the facts. It can be overwhelming for teen girls to experience changes in their body shape as they go through puberty. Speak with your pediatrician and dietitian to know if your teen’s weight changes are in a healthy range. If too high or too low, she may benefit from nutrition counseling.

 

Teach her to cook. Don’t know how? Take a cooking class with me! Kids who can cook some basics are not tied to restaurant sized portions or unhealthy junk when around town. Eat meals together. If it works that you eat dinner together, great. If your schedules prohibit that, then choose a different meal to be your priority.

 

Manage emotions without Ben & Jerry. If your daughter comes home upset about friend or relationship drama and your answer is two spoons and a pint, that is the coping skill she will have moving forward. While the occasional indulgence is perfectly fine, using food to smother emotions is not.

 

Take a walk together. It is hard to connect with a screen in the room. Whether it is a laptop, iPad or TV, the screen distracts from the real life connection. If you take a walk together, you have the chance to talk about what is really going on in each others lives and to fit in some physical activity too.

 

Reward without food. For a job well done, look for rewards are are exciting, without having to be food each time. Younger kids love earning stickers, bubbles or temporary tattoos, older kids may get excited about magazines, movie tickets, nail polish or make-up.

 

Indulge joyfully, too. It is perfectly reasonable to have the occasional indulgence. Demonstrating balance with healthy eating and treats helps to not demonize any foods or cultivate an all-or-nothing attitude about health and nutrition. Compliment her; her beauty, her generosity and her brain.

 

Demonstrate having a positive body image. Having worked in a local clothing boutique, I was disheartened to overhear conversations between mother and daughter where the mother was disparaging her own figure. Mom is a guide on many things, and if her own body image is poor, this can impact your daughters perception of her own figure.

 

For more information, I recommend you check out Fitsmi, an evidence-based online nutrition counseling program. They offer an engaging 16 week program for teen girls aged 13-18 as well as a 7 week program for parents. Teens, visit life180inc.com and parents, visit fitsmi.ning for more information. Ready to sign up? Use codes “teen” and “parent” on those sites to save 30%!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the first of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Do we really need eight glasses of water each day? -Bottled Up

 

Dear Bottled Up:
Water serves many important functions in our body. How much we need to drink changes day to day and depends on how much we move, the temperature and humidity, how much we eat and more.

 

The best way to know your hydration status is by checking out the color if your urine; light yellow to clear indicates adequate hydration. Anything darker means you’re ready for more water, so bottoms up! Be aware, certain medications, supplements and vitamins can alter the color of your urine, as can beets.

 

Why not wait until you’re thirsty? Our thirst mechanism is not terribly accurate to begin with and declines with age. By the time you notice thirst, you may already need a glass or two of water.

 

Did you know that much of the bottled water sold is just tap water? Most of those bottles end up in the trash for an enormous environmental impact. Our tap water is clean, reliable and affordable, so grab a reusable bottle, fill it up and skip the plastic.

 

Beyond a reusable bottle of tap water, we obtain a significant amount of water from our diet. From fruits to vegetables and soups to yogurt, our foods can contribute significantly to our hydration status. We actually make a small amount of our water too. This is called metabolic water and occurs, for example, when we link two amino acids together. Each connection made spits out one water molecule!

 

Adequate hydration is important for many reasons. Water helps to maintain a stable temperature, to transport nutrients to each cell and move waste away. It also lubricates and cushions your joints and actively participates in many chemical reactions.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Do you ever eat cookies? -Girl Scout


Dear Girl Scout:


I get this question all the time. As soon as a new acquaintances find out that I’m a dietitian, they’re steering their carts away from me in the grocery store or trying to cover their plate at a restaurant or making bold (usually false) assumptions about my diet.

 

It’s too easy to assume that health is all or nothing; you’re either eating the whole sleeve (or box) of thin mints, or being a martyr and having only iceburg lettuce and celery.

 

Luckily, health is a journey that resides somewhere in between those dire extremes. As a dietitian, I’m not the food police. I am not going to pull your cart over at the grocery store, nor will I write you a ticket for ordering french fries. My diploma did not change my taste buds. I am a foodie before I am a dietitian. If a dish doesn’t taste good, I’m not interested in eating it any more than you are.

 

I grew up with a prolific vegetable garden in the back yard and a mother who cooked dinner each night. Spring marked the beginning of fresh, delicious produce, from sugar peas to delicate asparagus. Summer marched through sweet peppers and delicious tomatoes, and Fall produced a bounty of fresh pumpkin, sweet corn and lots of purple pole beans, which my dad chose to plant because they were easier and more fun for us kids to pick. I don’t know anyone else who made applesauce during their childhood.

 

It wasn’t until I went to college and had canned mushy green beans for the first time that I understood why people didn’t like vegetables. Real food, minimally processed and cooked well, is phenomenal. I think the reason we use so much salt, condiments and seasonings is because we’re using poor quality ingredients.

 

At times I also joyfully indulge. I like to make or buy the very best version of a treat and enjoy it slowly. Having a low-quality cake or brownie from a box isn’t going to do much to curb a sweet tooth.

 

I’m also human, prone to the same stresses and worries that we all are. I’m not perfect, but I’m usually ok with that. Nutella is my kryptonite: I have not developed any moderation there. I allow a jar in my house about once per season, as it is quickly devoured. When I was in college and homesick, having a warm mug of my mom’s applesauce helped me to feel better.

 

Overall, I do eat well, try to manage stress with productive outlets and create my home and office environments to support my wellness goals. But yes, I do eat cookies, and you can too!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Do carrots really help you to see at night? -Night Goggles

 

Dear Night Goggles:

 

No. But I won’t tell the kids if you don’t want me to. Carrots have Vitamin A and adequate Vitamin A, or beta-carotene, allows you to see within your genetic potential. Extra is not better, unless you’re preparing for an orange-toned halloween costume.

 

Deficiency of Vitamin A is the leading cause of of blindness in the developing world. Before total blindness occurs from Vitamin A deficiency, night vision is lost. This condition is called xerophthalmia and is rare in the US.

 

So how does Vitamin A work and how do carrots get involved?

 

Vitamin A has many jobs in our body, including vision, but also contributes to normal growth and development, reproduction and maintaining our immune system.

 

Carrots contain beta-carotene, a precursor or “provitamin” to Vitamin A. Your body is able to cleave beta-carotene to create two Vitamin A molecules.

 

Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin found in animal foods such as milk and eggs, and in high concentrations in cod liver oil.

 

As a fat soluble vitamin, it is possible to overdose if you consume too much. Toxic levels are unlikely to occur from eating whole foods, but possible from high doses of the cod liver oil or supplements.

 

Beta-carotene is the orange compound found in plant foods, including carrots, pumpkin, sweet potato. It’s also in green leafy veggies. Your body only converts beta carotene to Vitamin A if there is need. Like Vitamin A, carotenoids are fat soluble.

 

Cooking makes carotenoids more available for absorption, so you’ll absorb more from cooked carrots than raw. You are not going to risk overdose of Vitamin A from too many carrots because your body will not convert extra beta-carotene to Vitamin A.

 

However, if you go on a juice kick and consume many carrots, you skin may turn orange like a bad spray tan worthy of an oompa loompa. How to tell if your orange pallor is carrots or liver disease? Check your eyes – with jaundice, your eyes are also yellow. With beta-carotene colored skin, your eyes remain white.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Are sardines the same thing as anchovies? Are they good for you? -Tiny Fishes

 

Dear Tiny Fishes:
Anchovies and sardines are two different groups of fishes that have common features. Both tend to be small, are commonly brined and canned, and have a distinctive flavor.

 

Any fish is going to be an excellent source of complete protein, but some fish are higher in omega-3 fatty acids. These can be called “oily,” “fatty” or “cold water” fish. Either way, both sardines and anchovies are rich in Omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids help to keep us healthy, but as a whole, Americans are not eating enough of them.

 

What about mercury? What about the sustainability of our fisheries? All good questions. Larger fish may take more years to reach maturity. And the higher up on the food chain, the more likely you will have contamination from heavy metals such as mercury.

 

The best of the best? Fish that are sustainably raised, are not contaminated with heavy metals and provide a good dose of omega-3 fatty acids. The Monteray Bay Aquarium lists five kinds of fish meeting these stringent criteria and wild-caught Pacific sardines make the cut!

 

The Monteray Bay Aquarium has guides for consuming fish sustainably which are available online, as an App on your phone, or as a PDF guide you can print.

 

Calcium bonus: if you eat the whole fish, not just the fillet, you get the added benefit of calcium from the fish skeleton. This also applies if you eat canned salmon – you cannot taste the bones, but the nutritional benefit is there!

 

Below is a recipe for Roasted Brussels Sprouts that are really amazing – give them a try! I have also used sardines packed in tomato sauce as a base on pizzas as well as enjoyed sardines packed in mustard on crackers for a quick snack.

 

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Anchovies
1 stalk brussels sprouts
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon grainy mustard
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon honey
4 green onions, sliced
2 ounce can anchovy fillet in oil, minced, reserving oil
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup pecans

 

1. Preheat oven to 375 (or more, or less, roasting is really flexible).
2. Remove Brussels sprouts from stalk and trim to be about the same size. Keep tiny ones whole, half or quarter larger sprouts. Put on baking sheet and toss with a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper and roast for 25 minutes, stirring halfway through.
3. Drain anchovy filet oil into a small mixing bowl. Finely mince fillets and add to bowl. Add all other ingredients and whisk until combined. When brussels sprouts are tender, pour dressing around sheet pan and toss sprouts well to coat. Bake another five minutes or so or until nuts are fragrant and brussels sprouts are well browned.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly,

What is a whole grain, and how do I make sure I’m eating them?
~Goodness Grains

 

Dear Goodness Grains:
A whole grain has three parts: the endosperm, bran and germ. Refined grains like white flour have only the starchy endosperm. Without the germ, you lose valuable nutrients and without the bran you miss out on a rich source of fiber. Ideally, we would only eat whole grains. However, that is not practical for everyone. At a minimum, have half of your grain choices be whole grains. Are you usually consuming all refined grains? Focus on progress from there! 51% whole grain is a huge improvement from all refined wheat.

 

A healthy eating pattern is varied. For many Americans, we rely on wheat. I would recommend also including brown rice, corn, quinoa, oats and barley on regular rotation. Having wheat cereal for breakfast, a wheat bread sandwich for lunch, cheese and crackers for snack and whole wheat spaghetti for dinner is plentiful in whole grains, but stingy in variety. Instead, try oatmeal for breakfast, keep the sandwich for lunch, enjoy fresh popcorn for snack and top brown rice with stir a fry for dinner.

 

Feeling more adventurous? Give teff, millet, wild rice, amaranth or buckwheat a try. A healthy eating pattern is also moderate in size. Many people rely too heavily on starchy foods. A good portion size of starchy foods is about the size of one of your own fists. Popcorn and puffed cereal are an exceptions to this rule.

 

If choosing a packaged grain food, your ingredient labels are the key to navigating whole grains. The ingredients are listed from the most to the least item in the food. The first grain should be whole grain. If it says “enriched,” it is a refined grain product.

 

Remember that “multigrain” is not the same thing as “whole grain.” Multigrain simply means that the product contains several kinds of grains, whether or not they are whole or refined. I have seen several packages of 9- and 12-grain breads where the first ingredient is refined white flour!

 

Note: whole grain white flour is made from a low-protein variety that substitutes well for white flour in many recipes, such as muffins. It is an “albino” variety of wheat and does count as a whole grain choice.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly, Is it best to avoid all candy? -Easter Bunny

 

Dear Easter Bunny: 
Easter is just around the corner and for those of you celebrating with kids, you may be looking for some ideas for their baskets that won’t have them bouncing off the walls. I am not one to recommend banning all sweets, as complete withdrawal tends to increase interest, but there is room for less sugar, overall. We can even look for non-food treats that your kids will love. It does not have to revolve around junky foods to be a party or special occasion!

 

Bring on the fruit: Fruit is naturally sweet, so while it is a source of sugar, that sugar is packaged with other good nutrients and fiber.

 

Fruit leathers: These taste better than their gummy cousins and have only fruit for their ingredients. You can buy them or make your own.

 

Chocolate covered fruit: Look for a short ingredient list and dark chocolate; milk chocolate has more added sugar.

 

Sugarless gum or a cool toothbrush: Helps promote dental health. Make sure the kids are old enough to not swallow the gum.

 

Ready, set, action: Wouldn’t it be great if the kids were entertaining themselves so that the parents can catch up and enjoy their cup of coffee? You can make that happen.

 

Chinese jump rope: This is a great activity for kids to try that can fit in mom’s purse or dad’s pocket.

 

Garden supplies: It is evidence-based that kids who help grow vegetables eat them! Get your garden started with some seeds, a how-to book for gardening in containers your kids or even pint-sized garden tools.

 

Play Dough: Fun for everyone and you can look for colors to match the occasion Bubbles: best if you have nice weather and access to the outdoors. Probably not ideal for inside church or grandma’s house.

 

Get crafty: Everyone is happier when they have something fun to do. Be prepared with a few simple activities and the day will go smoothly for everyone.

 

Temporary Tattoos: What kid doesn’t love temporary tattoos? I still do love ’em and we can even find Easter themed versions. Stickers are another fun option.

 

Crayons or markers: Just make sure they stick to paper and don’t write on the walls! A new coloring book would pair nicely with the new crayons!

 

You don’t have to center the holiday around sugar. A small sweet treat is nice, but round out the celebration with family time and non-food fun. Happy holidays!

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!

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Dear Holly: Is dried fruit healthy, or is it just loaded with sugar? -Raisinette

 

Dear Raisinette:
Both fresh fruit and dried fruit contain sugar as well as many nutritional benefits, from vitamins and minerals, to fiber and phytochemicals. Most of all? Fruits are mainly water.

 

If you dry fresh fruit, you are removing most of the water and therefore most of the total mass. This makes a proper portion of dried fruit significantly smaller than most people would guess. I recommend about ¼ cup of dried fruit at a time. 1 cup of fresh grapes has about 100 calories. If you dry those grapes, you would end up with about ¼ cup of raisins.

 

Some dried fruits are also sweetened, making them a less-healthy choice. Dried cranberries are typically sweetened, as are cherries. Raisins are not usually sweetened. Unsweetened dried fruit is the healthiest choice. If you read the nutrition facts panel, you will see sugar. How do you know if the sugar is naturally occurring or added? Check the ingredients. If there is a sweetener listed there, sugar has been added.

 

For Oxford readers – check out MOON co-op’s excellent selection of bulk dried fruits. From apple rings, to pineapple, figs and mango, to apricots and raisins, there is a wide variety of options, most of which are unsweetened. Purchasing in bulk allows you to buy exactly what you want and not more!

 

For any snack, I like to pair at least two foods groups. Dried fruit is great for our on-the-go culture and pack easily in a purse or pocket. I like to pair dried fruit with nuts or seeds. Almonds and raisins are my favorite combo!

 

Fruit is an important part of a balanced, healthy diet. For most meals, a balance of fruits and vegetables should be the biggest thing on our plate. Fruits are not healthier or less healthy than vegetables, they simply provide different nutrients, but usually more calories.

 

Ready for a Real Food Wellness Challenge? Start the month with 21 Days of Real Food! Click to enroll in the challenge; we launch the 1st of each month.

 

What’s your question for Holly? Send them to info@hollylarsonrd.com. For more information and to make an appointment to work on your goals, visit Grass Roots Nutrition, LLC and BrideBod, owned by me, Holly Larson, a Registered Dietitian. Visit me online at hollylarsonrd.com and follow us on Facebook. Have a delicious, healthy day!