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Learn about a local event center that has a goal to cater to all.

Looking for a place to celebrate, host a charity event, or just looking for a place to collaborate with your coworkers? 

The Benison Events & Coworking, located in a historic building in the heart of Hamilton, wants to help you accomplish your goals, celebrate milestones, and support local. The 1920s building features vaulted ceilings, hand-carved walls, and original walnut doors and wood beams. 

“We have an event center on the main ballroom floor with a 2 million dollar bank vault room, bridal and groom suites with changing rooms and restrooms for both suites, kids zone playroom, balcony, full bar and a duel sided serving buffet, outdoor covered area, DORA, which includes an outdoor bar and green space and much more,” says Director of Events & Coworking Yvonne VanBibber.

The remainder of the floors in the building offer coworking spaces, a full kitchen, a podcast/video room, and office space. 

Although the building housing The Benison has been around for a while, the concept itself arrived on the scene in 2018 when owner Christy Nelson opened its doors. 

They say that what really drew them to the space and inspired them to turn The Benison into what it is today is the details and architecture of the building. That was also when the duo decided they wanted to create a space that would be a blessing to the community, bringing together a space focused on exceptional customer service.

“The word Benison resonated within the vision,” says VanBibber. “We learned that ‘Benison’ is derived from the Latin word benedictio which means to bless. The vision to create a blessing in Hamilton was birthed.” 

“Whatever your reason for gathering at The Benison — a celebration, business function, or charity event we declare a blessing over your event,” she adds. “Rest assured that we will surpass your expectations merging the right space with your dreams.” 

The Benison is an ideal space for connecting and networking or grabbing lunch or drinks at the bar. 

We can accommodate for groups up to 200 for business events or even something as small as a virtual mailbox,” says VonBibber. “At The Benison, our goal is to provide a professional place for connecting, working and taking full advantage of our facility which ranges from a podcast room to exercise classes.” 

And while it seems they’ve got it all covered now, there’s even more on the horizon for The Benison.  

We are creating the Hamilton’s first outdoor Green Space, which will include a life-size, fully interactive Cinderella Ball Carriage,” says VonBibber. “The ribbon cutting for this amazing new feature will be on Earth Day April 22nd.”

They are still hosting events and following COVID guidelines while tailoring to the clients’ needs.  

To learn more and for a full tour visit their website. You can also follow along on Facebook.

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Satisfy your sweet tooth without sacrificing your healthy diet. Click here to read more about a local couple putting smiles on faces with a frozen smoothie on a stick!

Honey Child Artisan Pops offers clean, delicious frozen pops.

Cincy Chic: What is Honey Child Artisan Pops?    
Sarah Thompson, Vice President of Operations at Honey Child Artisan Pops: Honey Child Pops on a mission to make clean eating delicious, easy, and fun. We make delicious frozen pops from whole blended fruit and natural sweeteners such as honey or maple syrup if we use any sweetener at all. You’ll find fun flavor combinations ranging from the traditional to the extraordinary, and many of our pops up the ante with superfood ingredients and plant-based proteins.  

Cincy Chic: What’s the inspiration behind it?  
Thompson: It all started with a chance run-in with an ice cream truck. It was parked in front of our kids school between us and our walk home. We wanted a treat for ourselves but weren’t exactly thrilled about the consequences that came with all that sugar and dairy. Of course we treated ourselves, but on the way home we started thinking about what our ideal ice cream truck treat would be. We ordered some popsicle molds online and started experimenting that same week.

Cincy Chic: Who’s behind it? 
Thompson: Myself and my husband Damien founded Honey Child. Damien is a professional food photographer with a focus on consumer packaged goods. I am a former professional dancer/choreographer with a background in yoga and herbal medicine. Our daughters Sekai and Malia are our inspiration, our taste testers, and our youthful creative energy.

Damien and Sarah Thompson, Founders of Honey Child Artisan Pops.

Cincy Chic: When did you launch Honey Child Artisan Pops?  
Thompson: We launched in January 2019!

Cincy Chic: What makes Honey Child Artisan Pops so great?
Thompson: Our “Play Pops” are simply made from whole blended fruit and a touch of honey or maple syrup. They come in classic flavors like Strawberry and Raspberry Lemonade and more unusual combinations such as Pineapple Lemongrass and Strawberry Basil. Our Power Pops build on the idea, adding in superfood ingredients and plant-based proteins. Some Power Pops have no added sweetener other than the fruits and veggies inside. They are truly like a smoothie on a stick.

Cincy Chic: What makes Honey Child Pops unique?   
Thompson: All of our pops are free from dairy and cane sugar.  We add in sneaky functional ingredients such as calming chamomile, cooling tumeric with black pepper or immune-boosting turkey tail mushroom, and the pops are delicious!  With plenty of low calorie, low sugar, nutrient dense options, you can even eat our pops for breakfast!

Cincy Chic: Is there anything new on the horizon?  
Thompson: Look for our carts popping up in communities in the greater Cincinnati area and throughout Ohio. We are also available at local grocers, and we recently launched at select Whole Foods Market stores.

Cincy Chic: Where can readers go to learn more and follow along?  
Thompson: Follow us on Instagram or Facebook or visit our website at www.honeychildpops.com.

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Local news anchor Alanna Martella continues her story of courage and strength, beating death, and winning at life.

In Part 1 of her story Alanna Martella shared her story of courage and strength, beating death and winning at life.

In Part 2 we asked Alanna to share her strengths and opportunity areas in wellness.  

“I think there’s a season for everything” said Martella. “I hope to one day be able to confidently say I excel and am aligned on all levels simultaneously, but at the sake of being vulnerable, it depends on when you’re asking. Some days I feel my physical self is excelling. Other days, I feel pretty strong about my occupational area or mental state.”

Alanna has used this strength to add a new item on her resume: keynote speaking. During the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown the pandemic Alanna spent her free time writing a keynote speech to help impact and inspire others. Through her RISE UP model, Martella hopes to ignite the flame in every person who listens that you can (and will!) overcome enormous obstacles and seize opportunities, through a series of 5 basic steps.

Alanna identifies her sense of spirituality as her biggest strength in wellness.  “Meditation is known to ease uncertainty and unkind thoughts. Just 10 minutes a day really makes a difference. I also like listening to hz frequencies and reaching out to friends and talking to them or facetiming them.”  

Martella loves to move and finds joy particularly through practicing yoga.  It is in this practice that she is able to best manage her mental health.  

Through the ups and downs of her physical health journey, Alanna has always been willing to be open and transparent, leadinng to the creation of “Girls with Guts Podcast” with fellow intestinal illness warrior Nicole Dambro.   

Want to learn more about Alanna Martella’s Rise Up keynote or Girls with Guts podcast? Visit alannamartella.com.

Bag spill content, left to right: Orbit Bubblemint Sugar Free Chewing Gum, Crunchmaster Crackers (Kroger), Burts Bees Vanilla Bean.

“A Leadership Style” is a column authored by WISe Wellness Guild founder Stevi Gable Carr and powered by Crunchmaster Crackers aimed at celebrating female leaders who have advanced in their careers because they have integrated work and life through whole-self wellness.  

Glossary of terms: 

Womxn: noun, plural wom·xn [wim-in] /ˈwɪm ɪn/. a woman (used, especially in intersectional feminism, as an alternative spelling to avoid the suggestion of sexism perceived in the sequences m-a-n and m-e-n, and to be inclusive of trans and nonbinary women)

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On being met where we are.

Last week was a tough one for me. Tough is relative – I know everyone has their stuff. I know my version of tough is nothing compared to another’s. All the same, for me, it was a tough week. My childcare fell through in the afternoons, so as soon as naptime was over, my work time was over. My husband helps immensely but he has an employer and works full-time. His hours are limited during the day. After the pandemic started, I chose to pivot, leave my employer, and start my business, Wellison Enterprises, allowing time and flexibility to navigate raising 3 young children. I had always wanted to do this and given the nature of the pandemic and balancing having a career, this seemed like the best time to jump because my family needed me more than ever. It has had a lot of benefits. It also has its days. 

Last week probably would have been more tolerable but for the fact that my daughter is amid 18-month sleep regression, so we are averaging about 3 hours of sleep per night, right now, again. The compounding effect of a lack of sleep on the lack of help that I deeply rely on to get things done was a lot – even for someone like me who has a lot of emotionally therapeutic tools in her toolbelt to navigate these situations. Sometimes tools are unmatched compared to a screaming, fussy, growing 18-month-old, who wanted to either be held, or completely left to her own devices, which included tearing through every possible cabinet, learning how to climb onto the dining room table, gravitating toward the fire poker, and when that was taken, sitting in the ashes of the fireplace, among other things. Dinners did not get cooked. Cleaning did not happen. The older kids had a lot of screen time when home. And yes, I got to that place. The one everyone dreads. The one nobody wants to admit to. 

I felt sorry for myself. 

I think the level of pain I had last week was amplified by a collective pain for all the mothers who were able to rely on fluid and functional childcare until the pandemic hit. Yes, this is a place of privilege. Yes, it implies access and financial security. In case nobody has noticed, it is also a huge reason why almost 3 million women have left the workforce. There is a collective grieving happening right now because there is a lot of loss. Last week hurt deeply, not because the babysitter cancelled, but because lack of childcare now for me, is a triggering event. Not having childcare has created trauma in my life. The new way of navigating parenting children and working as a mom – even a mom who started and owns her own business now – looks quite different than it did a year ago. It has uncovered that what we believed to be true, was never true to begin with. Yes, I received more time with my children, and I am grateful for that. And I am sad because that part of trust and access in my life died. It is being rebirthed in a new form – a much more honest form. But there is grieving to this process. 

It was a learned belief that my husband and I had access to paid childcare when we needed it, until we did not. And when we did not, I was the one who had to really step up to the plate at home – and this is while I had a full-time job too. That experience has instilled in my mind a limiting belief that I will experience loss every single time a childcare-giver cancels last minute (and stuff happens – this is not a critique on my amazing caregivers). It brings back the panic and invisibility I felt a year ago. I am still very much in the grieving and the figuring out of what the hell happened. I fully intend to move past this belief and recover from this trauma, and I am doing the work to get there. But it is very raw right now. I imagine it is for so many others as well. 

And you know what? It is ok. It is ok that I cried out of frustration. It is ok that I felt alone and like quitting everything. The really hard part is that I did not feel like I could talk to anyone about this. It seems as though this narrative is becoming played, and folks are tired of hearing about the squeeze women experience daily at the loss of childcare – even other women. Even other mothers. Not feeling like I could be received where I was made me feel very alone and invisible. It revealed something to me – and this is very vulnerable for me to say – last week, I needed and was looking for sympathy.

Sometimes sympathy helps us feel seen. And yes, I am referring to sympathy. Not empathy. Empathy implies the person has been there or can imagine being in the shoes of another. Sympathy implies that they have not been there, and cannot imagine being in the situation, but that they see there is a hard time going on, and then they gently acknowledge this. A simple “I see it’s been a rough week. I hope it gets better soon,” goes a lot further than an “at least you’re not …” or “You got this! Just push through.” Reframing can be helpful in a lot of situations, but it is also a defense mechanism that communicates to the other, “I can’t be bothered by this. Or your discomfort is a drag,” and it’s used to avoid having to deal with uncomfortable emotions. It has nothing to do with the person feeling the pain, and everything to do with the person prescribing the reframe. Reframing can actually perpetuate the pain of the other by making them feel less than or not entitled to their own emotion. It’s a good thing to watch out for because it is easy to do. 

However, well-intended sympathy can equate to grace. To holding space for another in grief. An acknowledgement. Not pity. It’s about saying, “I meet you where you are. I see a brighter day ahead, but you take the time you need. It’s ok to feel this way.”

Think about it in this context: when people are grieving the loss of a loved one, people often offer sympathy – not empathy. They offer sympathy because they have not gone through the tragic situation and are not the ones in total grief, but they want to acknowledge the person who is – that they see them and that the hold space for them. Most of the time, it is not pity that founds sympathy, it is grace and understanding that life is hard in this season for another, and that it is ok for them to be where they are. It is letting them know this. When you think about the mass exodus of working women, and of the ones who specifically left because they had to become primary caregivers after it became clear the system was hollow, understand they are grieving. They are grieving their freedom to work and raise kids in the way that they chose. They are grieving the part of their identity they so strongly held onto after shifting into motherhood – the one that said, “I am still a person too.” They are grieving the fact that they were told the institution had their back, but when push came to shove, it had nothing to offer them. 

So sometimes if you don’t to know what to say, sympathy will do fine. “Sym-” means “together,” and “-path” means “emotion.” I think that there is value in that. Meet us where we are.  

Whitney Ellison is a thought leader and coach of the Enneagram and Quantum Energy. Learn more about her by visiting her website, wellisonenterprises.com and following her @wellisonenterprises on Instagram where you can find all of her Enneagram series interviews and other comings and goings.

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Earth Day is this week so what a great time to recycle your thoughts and limiting beliefs. Our business & life coach columnist reminds us how to manifest your desires and create more abundance, success, and love in your life.

The law of attraction and manifesting came to light when Rhonda Byrne releases the book “The Secret” in 2006, followed by the movie. Soon after, we were flooded with others sharing resources and teaching how your thoughts create all you desire in life.  Simply said, “if you ask; it will be given.”

Many were happy to learn this new tool for creating all the things in life they desired.  While others believe manifesting and law of attraction does NOT work, calling bullsh*t on this way of thinking and acting. 

What’s your experience and belief around manifesting and the law of attraction? 

Do you believe the law of attraction is always working? Take a look around and see if your thoughts, beliefs and emotions didn’t create your reality.  Do you like what you see?

What I know for sure is that the law of attraction and manifesting takes daily practice and some patience.   I’ve not perfected this practice, but I am aware when it’s at work how magical it feels to realize “I called that right in for myself.” Yes, sometimes it’s not what you expect, it just is.  

So, since this week is Earth Day, why not recycle your old limiting beliefs and practice aligning your thoughts to a new outcome using the following guidelines: 

Create the vision and collect images matching the desired outcome and place them on a poster board, Pinterest, or on your phone in an album.

Take inspired action of any kind toward the vision. If you want a new home, buy a painting, or throw pillow you’ll bring to the new house. Want more money? Start putting a dollar a day in a jar. Action will keep the vision of what you want and why at the top of your mind. Be creative. 

Visualize daily playing make-believe games with the vision board. Act as if you already have it.

Be cautious not to give up too fast. All things come in divine timing with manifesting. Seeing it before it appears, along with how it will feel, believing it is well on its way to you with each inspired action toward the desire you take, is your job. The Universe does the rest.

From there as you change your thoughts, you will change your reality. When in doubt, use the mantra “I am open to receive all that my heart desires.”

Cheers to creating the life you deserve!

Melissa

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Read about a local wine importer and distributor that brings exclusive wines from Spain straight to the Queen City.

Key Wines brings imported wines from Spain to Cincinnati.

Key Wines, a local wine importer and distributor, is built on the idea that everyone deserves great wine. 

“Our name Key Wines comes from a passion to unlock this undiscovered world of wine and give people access to it,” says Key Wines Co-Founder Robin Hunsucker. “We also believe that wine is ‘key’ and has been culturally important throughout history and is something that brings people together still today.” 

Robin Hunsucker, a Cincinnati native and wine lover, and Gil Nuñez, a wine maker and Sommelier from Barcelona, are Co-founders of Key Wines and met on a trip to Spain. They fell in love and the rest is history. 

The couple’s main goal for the company was to give people in Cincinnati the same access to the same great wine from small producers that they typically drank in Spain. 

Key wines works directly with small, family-run wineries in Spain to bring exclusive, affordable and high quality wines to the Cincinnati area.

We cut out all of the middle men and import/distribute ourselves in order for the wine to reach the end consumer without as many of the normal mark-ups, says Hunsucker.

As if Key Wines wasn’t unique enough, some of their wines can only be found in Cincinnati and no other place in the U.S. 

All of our wines are farmed organically or almost organically and they don’t use chemical products, additives, stabilizers or the other crap that many wines have,” Hunsucker says 

Key Wines warehouse is located in Evendale. You can find their wines all over Cincinnati in many local bars, restaurants and stores. 

“You can find our wines at any of the following bars/restaurants/stores around the city: Alfio’s Buon Cibo, Anjou (opening soon), Dear Restaurant & Butchery, E+O, Higher Gravity, Hoppin’ Vines, Mash Roots, Mita’s, LouVino, North High Brewing, Rebel Mettle Brewery, The Fix, The Hub, The Spicy Olive, Wildflower Café and World Glass Bar,” she adds. 

Cava, a sparkling wine, “is definitely a crowd favorite,” Hunsucker says. “Some other popular wines are our Albariño (a classic white wine from the Atlantic coast in Spain), Las Garnachas (a juicy Grenache from Rioja), Merian (a line of organic wines made of Grenache that comes in red, white and rosé) and MIN (a red blend from Priorat).”

Key Wines is looking to get into more bars and restaurants around the city and continue their mission of giving people access to high-quality wine that is affordable for everyone. 

We also do private tastings at people’s homes, so our hope is that once things go back to normal we can expand that side of our business,” she says. 

To follow along you can find them on Instagram or on Facebook.

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A store for tots (and grownups!) just expanded to Cincinnati. Click here to read more.

Gumdrop Tots is a children’s store that recently opened a new location in Cincinnati.
Cincy Chic: What is Gumdrop Tots?
Suzy Hinnefeld & Brittney Braemer, Owners of Gumdrop Tots: 
Gumdrop is a shop for tots and their grownups! We bring energy, affection and a sense of discovery through our curated collection of beautiful and thoughtful products. We carry unique baby/kid clothing (0–24M, 2–5T), books, toys & games, gifts and accessories all in the heart of both downtown Covington and the Historic West Fourth District in downtown Cincinnati (right next door to our sister shop, Handzy Shop + Studio).

Cincy Chic: What’s the inspiration behind it?
Hinnefeld & Braemer: When we started Handzy in 2015 we always dreamt of opening a kids store. We referred to the idea as “Handzy Jr.” and when we moved our Covington Handzy location one storefront over we realized the empty space we left would be a perfect spot to pursue this dream. Handzy has always had a fun, youthful and colorful energy which translates perfectly when curating products for little ones!

Cincy Chic: Who’s behind it?
Hinnefeld & Braemer: We are! We’re best friends who met in design school at UC’s DAAP are the women behind Gumdrop!
 
Cincy Chic: Why did you decide to open a new Cincinnati location?
Hinnefeld & Braemer: We love our Covington location but realized that crossing the river was a barrier for our Cincinnati customer base. When we thought about the growth of our store and businesses it only made sense to expand across the river!  
 
Cincy Chic: What makes Gumdrop unique?
Hinnefeld & Braemer: In the baby/toddler space there is a trend towards neutral minimalism and Gumdrop is the opposite of that. Our shop is filled with color and fun which makes us unique. 
 
Cincy Chic: Where are your storefronts located?
Hinnefeld & Braemer: Our storefronts are located in Covington (15 W. Pike St. Covington, KY 41011) and Cincinnati (326 W. 4th St. Cincinnati, OH 45202).
 
Cincy Chic: Is there anything new on the horizon for 2021?
Hinnefeld & Braemer: In 2021 we’re working towards growing our customer base so we can continue to offer new and unique products! 
 
Cincy Chic: Where can readers go to learn more and follow along?
Hinnefeld & Braemer: You can follow us on Instagram or visit our website at gumdroptots.com 

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Click here to understand how the words we use are a sign of the internal work that needs our attention.

I met with a spiritual teacher last week. It was powerful. There were a handful of times that I used the word “hate,” and when I did, it was fueled with emotion. She would pause me after I would say the statement, “I hate it when that happens.” Or “I hate malice,” in the context of when I suspect people of have ill intentions toward me (a discussion for another day). I consider myself to have some strong tools, so you can imagine the shame and sadness that hit me when I realized this truth about myself. Darn it – there it is again: that ever-present and gently uncomfortable reminder – I am still work in progress.

We talked about the word “hate”. About how we can choose freedom from that word and the burden it presents. Hate does not serve us. I reflected on this. I believe and teach that forgiveness is the ultimate freedom: for and from ourselves. It unshackles us from the thing that happened to us. It is an action not meant to unshackle the other person- they were never shackled by our pain to begin with – only by their own. The effect of the pain we harbor, caused (accidentally, subconsciously, or intentionally) by another only holds us hostage – and if we do not reckon with it, it comes back and comes back and comes back. Even when we try to block it and control it with words like “hate”.

Hating something or someone makes us feel small and is the opposite of freedom. It returns us to the wounded child who desperately needs our love and affirmation of worthiness. It cycles until we reckon with it – by identifying the source or the roots – and extracting them. Words like hate are simply flags that there is internal work to be done.

I have found work to do.  And thank God, I suppose. Because the day I stop finding more spiritual work to do might be the day I depart from this Earthly plane, and I am not particularly interested in leaving too soon. 

What I learned from this conversation is that there are places, things and people that have triggered a pain so deep, I have only been able to label my response and beliefs grown from that pain as hate or other low vibrational emotions. This allows a continued assault on myself. Allowing hate in – even if just in semantics – really means I have allowed the pain to settle and fester. If I want to continue to lead and help others rise, I must also continue to help myself rise by unloading the weight that holds me back.

Hate begets hate. Love begets love. I choose love. It was love that brought me to this conversation, love that helped me see I have work to do, love that will support the processing and love that will allow me to forgive – both myself and others. It is love that makes way for freedom.

That is my truth. What is yours?

Whitney Ellison is a thought leader and coach of the Enneagram and Quantum Energy. Learn more about her by visiting her website, wellisonenterprises.com and following her @wellisonenterprises on Instagram.

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Read about the team living by the motto: Fortune Favors the Daring!

Cincy Chic: What is Rebel Mettle Brewery?
Mike Brown, President & CEO at Rebel Mettle Brewery: Questioners of the status quo; brewers, patriots, scholars, and believers. Since the beginning, we’ve wanted to create a place that celebrates freedom, opportunity, justice, and community. A place where everyone is welcome. Unique and united by our love of lager, we are forging our own path, questioning the rules and following the Rebellious Spirit in us ALL! Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Lagers.

Cincy Chic: What’s the inspiration behind it?
Brown: Rebel Mettle Brewery was inspired by a celebration of a rebellious sprit and forging one’s own path. “Fortune Favors the Daring” is our motto!

Cincy Chic: Who’s behind it?
Brown: Our team is made of myself, who serves as president and CEO; Greg Goeke, vice president of operations; and Duane Donohoo, our CFO.

Cincy Chic: What can readers find on the menu?
Brown: A wide variety of lagers, ales, and seltzers.

Cincy Chic: What makes Rebel Mettle Brewery unique?
Brown: We focus more on lager production, we wish to be a trendsetter in a rebirth of American Craft Lager. We are Veteran owned and our location is awesome!

Cincy Chic: What are you looking forward to most as the possibility of eliminating COVID-19 restrictions approaches?
Brown: We’re really looking forward to packing this place to the rim with cool folks and jamming to killer tunes!

Cincy Chic: Is there anything new on the horizon?
Brown: We will be canning our three flagship beers within the next 45 days.

Cincy Chic: Where can readers go to learn more and follow along?
Brown: Check out our website at www.rebelmettlebrewery.com. We’re also on Facebook and Instagram.

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If it takes great courage to follow your dreams, how do you characterize someone who beats death, chases their dreams and wins multiple Emmy Awards, all before the age of 30? Perhaps we ask Alanna Martella, Traffic Anchor at WLWT.

A lot of times, society tells us that our goals are “too lofty,” are “pipe dreams” or that we’ll “never make it” — and in turn, that message can discourage us from pushing forth and working to make our dreams happen. Not for Alanna. “When it comes to my career journey, I am most proud of having the courage to pursue my dreams and visions. To be able to say I’ve been able to tack off those career visions I’ve had since a little girl (and even those that I continue to tack off now with my “big girl dreams”) is extremely humbling and satisfying” said Martella when asked about achieving at such a relatively young age.

On the surface, Alanna’s life could appear to be a simple and easy, however, her life has truly been a rollercoaster of highs, lows, peaks and valleys. As mentioned in a previous feature in Cincy Chic, Alanna experienced death. This past year has been one full of continued health challenges, forcing her to be admitted several times to the hospital during the pandemic for issues directly related to her intestinal illness.

How has she managed to thrive amidst the chaos? By taking mindfulness and snack breaks with healthy nibbles like Crunchmaster Crackers and Think! Bars. “Meditation has been an absolute game-changer for me” said Martella. “Yes, physical health is important for wellness (and I think that’s what might pop into most people’s head when they think of wellness), but if you don’t have your mental state in check, that will spiral out to your overall well-being on all levels.”  

Due to Alanna’s health challenges she has been open about her decision to do In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) and freeze her eggs. “My health history has caused my egg supply to diminish significantly, and though right now it’s still up in the air if having kids is a part of my life path, ‘down the road’ will likely be too late.”  You can learn more about Alanna’s decision to IVF on May 4th as a panelist at “The Motherhood Journey” event, presented by The Christ Hospital. 

In part 2 of Alanna’s story we’ll discuss her commitment to inspiring others through telling stories of hope and resilience through keynote speaking and her new podcast!.  

Learn more about Alanna Martella visit alannamartella.com.

Bag spill content, left to right: Think! Bar, Crunchmaster Crackers (Kroger), Orbit Bubblemint Sugar Free Chewing Gum, ZO Skin Health, Burts Bees Vanilla Bean, MEAS Active, Christian Dior Refillable Lipstick, Bath & Body Works Stress Release Lotion, Crest Toothpaste and Oral-B Dental Floss.

“A Leadership Style” is a column authored by WISe Wellness Guild founder Stevi Gable Carr and powered by Crunchmaster Crackers aimed at celebrating female leaders who have advanced in their careers because they have integrated work and life through whole-self wellness.  

Glossary of terms: 

Womxn: noun, plural wom·xn [wim-in] /ˈwɪm ɪn/. a woman (used, especially in intersectional feminism, as an alternative spelling to avoid the suggestion of sexism perceived in the sequences m-a-n and m-e-n, and to be inclusive of trans and nonbinary women)

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