Cincinnati Art Museum’s Bee Program

Cincinnati Art Museum’s Bee Program

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Read on to learn about a program that wants to share what bees offer in the community.

Photo: DanielPrudek / iStock / Getty Images Plus

There is a program that wants to support the bee ecosystem. Cincinnati Art Museum’s Bee Program is a “partnership with the Queen City Pollinator Project that places two beehives on the museum grounds that support the ecosystem and the community,” Jill Dunne, Director of Marketing and Communications at the Cincinnati Art Museum, says. “The hives will sit amidst a pollinator garden, a foot off the ground in a mulch bed near the Longsworth Administrative Wing on the west side of the building.”

The idea for the program came from a passion for the community. “The museum has been focusing on the wellness of the community over the last several years,” she says. “The program supports the ecosystem which supports community wellness.” Bees are so important for the ecosystem around them. “Globally there are more honeybees than other types of bee and polluting insects, so it is the world’s most important pollinator of food crops. It is estimated that one third of the food we consume each day relies on pollination mainly by bees,” Dunne says. 

The people involved with the project are: Cincinnati Art Museum’s Green Team, the Women’s Committee of the Cincinnati Art Museum and the Queen City Pollinator Project. “QCPP helps support declining and threatened pollinator population in urban neighborhoods in Greater Cincinnati by providing beehives and beekeeping support to sustain a healthy bee community,” she says. These organizations have helped to fund the Cincinnati Art Museum’s Bee Program, which takes about $2500 per year to keep the program running. To help with funding, they also will be having an Adopt-A-Bee event. This will be happening from May 3-31, 2021 and people will be able to choose to provide a $5 or $10 donation. “Each donation provides an opportunity to name one of the 60,000 bees who will reside in the museum’s two hives. They will be able to do so online at: https://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/bees,” Dunne says.

Why is this so important for the community? “Pollinators are a vital part of a balanced ecosystem and without them we would not survive. Nearly all pollinators are suffering from declining populations and we need to take immediate action to protect and support them,” she says. Dunne’s vision for the bee program is for the public to see the bees in a positive light. “Since bees can fly around three miles for food, we hope that people see the “friendly” bees around downtown Cincinnati, in Walnut Hills and Mount Adams and remember the museum and the positive impact that bees can make,” she says. In mid-April, depending on the weather, the bees and the hives will be installed. “QCPP will put in the physical hives and relocate swarms of bees into the hives,” she says. 

If you want to keep up with what’s going on with the Cincinnati art Museum Bee Program, follow them on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and their website.

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