Where Does Cincinnati Get Its Water?

Where Does Cincinnati Get Its Water?

Have you ever stopped to think about how the City of Cincinnati gets its water and how it's cleaned? Read on as our resident expert offers insight.

Have you ever wondered where Cincinnati’s water comes from? There are plenty of bodies of water that meet here to combine with the Ohio River, but are theses the same waters that we later drink, cook with, and take showers in?

For more than 200 years, the Greater Cincinnati Water Works has treated and provided the Queen City with its water supply. It’s lasted through wars, floods, and fires, and continues to provide safe, quality drinking water for the region. 

The Greater Cincinnati Water Works supplies water from two sources. One source is the Miller Treatment Plant, which treats surface water from the Ohio River and supplies 88 percent of drinking water to Greater Cincinnati Water Works’ customers, including most of the City of Cincinnati. The other source is the Bolton Treatment Plant. This plan treats groundwater from ten wells in the Great Miami Aquifer. It’s located in southern Butler County and is 150-200 feet deep and 2 miles wide. The Bolton Plant supplies about 12 percent of Greater Cincinnati Water Works water.

Both the Ohio River and the Great Miami Aquifer provide plenty of water supply to the area and a focus on protecting those source waters. That’s why Greater Cincinnati Water Works regularly tests water from the Ohio River before it even enters the treatment plant. Additionally, Greater Cincinnati Water Works also works with an early warning organic detection system, the first of its kind. This system: 

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  • Warns treatment plants downstream about spills so that measures can be taken before the spill reaches water intakes
  • Was developed by water utilities along the Ohio River in conjunction with the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission
  • Consists of 13 monitoring stations located along the Ohio River

The state’s Environmental Protection Agency says that the Ohio River is highly susceptible to contamination, like other surface waters, and that makes it even more important that the Ohio EPA and Greater Cincinnati Water Works work together to ensure the safety and protection of the water.

The Bolton Treatment Plant treats groundwater and provides water to the northwestern area of Hamilton County and parts of Warren and Butler counties. And because the Great Miami Aquifer does not have a protective clay layer, it is also susceptible to becoming contaminated. To help keep this water safe, Greater Cincinnati Water Works is part of the Hamilton to New Baltimore Groundwater Consortium to protect the Greater Miami Aquifer.

Source: https://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/water/water-quality-and-treatment/water-sources-resource-protection/